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About Us

The Fox Project is a registered charity dedicated to the Red Fox

Established in 1991 as a specialist Wildlife Information Bureau,  Fox Deterrence Consultancy, it has incorporated  a Wildlife Hospital since 1993 which, today, admits and treats over 1000 foxes per year, including 250 cubs. It appears regularly on TV, radio and other media, both in the UK and internationally, has received awards from RSPCA, International Fund for Animal Welfare, media and TV and is honoured to have Chris Packham and Anneka Svenska as Patrons.

The Wildlife Information Bureau – 01892 824111 (weekdays – hours as per homepage) – regularly advises national and local government and all areas of the media as well as providing information to the public on all aspects of the Red Fox.  Its establishment was in response to an obvious requirement for science-based information on a species previously held up as ‘good’ by animal welfare groups and ‘bad’ by self-interested bloodsports organisations, both of whose advice was too often tailored to their preferred half of the story.

Our Fox Deterrence Consultancy provides Do-it-Yourself information on simple, humane and non-lethal methods of resolving conflict with urban foxes.  To that end, it works with, and recommends professional call-out consultancies that share our ethic, which precludes both destruction and relocation.  Its establishment was designed to provide a humane alternative to old-fashioned ‘pest control’, whereby animals are killed annually – usually at high cost to householders and businesses – only to be naturally and very predictably replaced within weeks by other members of a self-regulating species that has never been controlled by man.

The Wildlife Ambulance Service – 01892 731565 (hours as per homepage) operates over a 60 x 70 mile range over parts of Kent, Surrey, East and West Sussex and South East London, dealing with sick and injured foxes and abandoned fox cubs and working with a large team of local volunteer rescuers, fosterers and rehabbers to provide for their care, treatment and rehabilitation back into the wild.  Our policy, in line with those of ‘trade’ associations such as British Wildlife Rehabilitation Council, the majority of associated rescue groups and – most certainly – UK wildlife laws, is for recovered adult animals to be returned to their home territory and incorporates a programme of controlled rehabilitation of hand-raised fox cubs re-entering the wild in association and with the involvement of sympathetic farmers, smallholders and rural landowners.

Chris Packham

Anneka Svenska